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Page 2

CONTENTS

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Grammar in Brief – Grammar-based Key Word Transformation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

TEST 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

TEST 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

TEST 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

TEST 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

TEST 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

TEST 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

Further Practice in Key Word Transformation
focused on: grammar / structure, vocabulary and collocation or idiomatic expression . . . . . . . 122

Further Practice in Word Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Sample Answer Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159

Listening Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165

SA
M

PL
E


. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . .

tice in Key W
: grammar / struct

urther Pract

PA
G
ES

. . . 2

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . .

Page 10

10

PART 6
You are going to read an article about education. Six sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from
the sentences A-G the one which fits each gap (37-42). There is one extra sentence which you do not need to use.

A LESSON IN EDUCATION
You could say that the modern education system in Britain is based on equality. All boys and girls,

whether they are wealthy or not, are entitled to an education. However, it was not always like this.

In the early Middle Ages, education was mainly the responsibility of the church. It was,

therefore, only boys intending to become priests or monks who benefited from formal learning.

Grammar schools followed in the 12th century. First opened by the church to teach Latin grammar

to boys, by the 16th century such schools also taught the languages and literature of the ancient

Greeks and Romans. However, they were no longer run solely by the clergy, but by merchant and

trade associations as well. In fact, before the late 1800s, girls had little or no opportunity at

all to receive a formal education.

The poorer classes were also discriminated against. While the sons of wealthier families attended

exclusive ‘public schools’, the majority of the poor stayed at home. This problem was first

addressed in the 1700s with the introduction of ‘charity schools’ which provided free teaching and

clothing for the children of the poor. A type of modern-day ‘monitor’ can still be found in

some British schools today. Although they are not responsible for teaching lessons, these monitors,

or ‘prefects’ as they are now more commonly called, help to discipline the younger students and

teach them the rules of the school.

In 1870, elementary education was introduced by William Forster. ‘Elementary’ means basic, and the

aim was to teach students the basics of reading, writing and arithmetic, or the three ‘Rs’ as they were

known. Unlike charity schools, which were located mainly in towns and cities, primary schools were

built throughout the country so that more children could receive an elementary education. Many

children, however, were still unable to go to these schools; since their families were so poor, they

had to work instead. All children, male and female, whether wealthy or not, had to attend

primary school until the age of eleven.

In 1918, a new law was introduced to raise the school-leaving age. It meant that any student who

failed to be accepted into grammar school would still be entitled to a free education up until the age

of fourteen. Students now had to go to school until they were at least fifteen years old, and

new ‘secondary schools’ were developed. At the age of eleven all children would be made to take an

examination. The successful candidates would immediately begin grammar school, while the less

successful students would attend the new secondary schools.

Nowadays, most grammar and secondary schools have been replaced by comprehensive schools.

Comprehensive schools welcome students of all abilities, so there is no longer any need for

eleven-year-olds to take a special test. Although grammar schools still exist in some places,

comprehensive education, which is generally considered to be the fairest system, offers a high

standard of education to all.

42

41

40

39

38

37

Reading & Use of English - Part 6Practice Test 1

SA
M

PL
E

are

mmonly ca

was introduced by

he basics of readin

chools, whi

e country so tha

, were still una

instead.

y school until the a

918, a new law

o be acce

40M

PA
G
ES
mal lea

each Latin gram

literature of the an

lergy, but by me

s had little or no o

e sons of wealt

stayed at home

arity schools’ wh

mod

ble

Page 11

11

A Although many people were against it, this system continued

for almost thirty years.

B Free education was introduced only at the beginning of the

20th century.

C Although the majority of British schools continue to be

state-run, the government is actively encouraging them to

become more independent and to take greater control of

their own affairs.

D It wasn’t until almost four hundred years later that grammar

schools opened their doors to female students.

E Less than thirty years later, the education policy was

changed again.

F For this reason, ten years later, elementary education was

made compulsory.

G It was in these schools that older students learned from the

teachers and then passed their knowledge on to the younger

students.

Reading & Use of English - Part 6Practice Test 1

AM
P

M
PL

E


years later, e

sor

n these schools t

hers and th

ents.

PA
G
ES

be

m to

control of

ater that gramm

le students.

e edu

Page 20

20

PART 3 (approximately 4 minutes) (Candidates A and B)

Follow your teacher’s instructions.

PART 4 (approximately 4 minutes) (Candidates A and B)

Listen to your teacher and answer his / her questions.

Speaking - Parts 3 & 4Practice Test 1

How necessary
is each item?

books
telephone &

answering machine

stereo

CDs

computer

TV & DVD player

Changes in People’s Attitudes

mately 4

PL

S

AG

Page 21

6 PRACTICE TESTS

FOR THE CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH FIRST (FCE) FOR SCHOOLS

Key features of the book are:

ñ Clear, concise presentation of the most important grammatical &

structural phenomena tested at this level. Each grammar section is

followed by transformations. This will help candidates consolidate

the knowledge of grammar and structure they have gained during

previous years of study. As a result, candidates will feel more

confident in their use of the language, and more able to cope with

the Reading & Use of English section of the examination.

ñ These six complete practice tests accurately reflect the content, level

and format of the examination.

ñ Further practice in Key Word Transformation focused on

grammar / structure, vocabulary and collocation or idiomatic

expression.

ñ Further practice in Word Formation.

Components: Student’s Book ● Teacher’s Book ● CDs

ISBN 13: 978-960-409-818-7

of

their use

& Use of En

ese six complete

and rm of th

ñ Further

gramm

exp

ñ

(FCE) FOR SCHO

he most impo

ted at this level.

tions. This wil

ar an

a

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