Download 8. ICCO Guidelines on Lobby and Advocacy 2010 PDF

Title8. ICCO Guidelines on Lobby and Advocacy 2010
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Document Text Contents
Page 1

Guidelines on lobby
and advocacy

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Page 2

June 2010

CREDITS

Text Huub Sloot and Mariken Gaanderse

Partly based on training materials of

Annemarie Gehrels

Editing Roeline Knottnerus

Cartoons Auke Herrema (www.aukeherrema.nl)

Design cover ICCO

Design interior Margo Vlamings (www.margovlamings.nl)

Printing Drukkerij Roos en Roos

ICCO
Postbus 8190
3503 RD Utrecht
www.icco.nl

Guidelines on lobby
and advocacy

Page 28

SteP

05

2�

As you can see, the chances to influence are highest in the initial
phase of the decision-making process. This is because the issue
is not yet (or just has been put) on the political agenda and there
are still many opportunities to get your point across. In the analytic
phase, information and facts will increasingly be put forward,
making it more difficult to change the opinion of the people
concerned. Chances are lowest at the moment of formal decision-
making: generally decision-makers do not like to change their
position at this point in the process (they would appear to suffer
a loss of face). In the implementation phase, new stakeholders
generally come into play, which means new opportunities for
influencing the implementation of the decision made. However, the
overall conclusion must remain that it is always best to seek early
influence.

The graph also shows the visibility of the influencing process;
showing a high visibility at the moment of formal decision-making
(often related to high media coverage by the decision-maker).
However, a lobbyist is often looking for less visibility as this might
help to seek out suitable alternatives and win - win situations
without the risk of stakeholders and decision-makers “losing face”.

SteP

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SteP

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SteP

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Prepare your organisation,

network or programme coalition

for lobby and advocacy

To gain more knowledge and
control over your lobby and
advocacy programme you have to
prepare your organisation, network

or coalition. This often starts with an assessment to help you
to get a better idea of the current organisational situation and of
the actual resources available for lobby and advocacy. Such an
assessment can give you a better feel for future developments,
whether positive or negative.

Important questions are: What are the methods and techniques
(e.g. awareness-raising, public action, meetings with MPs, petition)
that the organisation, network or coalition has at its disposal? What
are the internal procedures for issuing statements, writing position
papers and the like? What is the added value of the organisation,
network or coalition in relation to the identified lobby and advocacy
topic (e.g. expertise from partner organisations).

Page 55

June 2010

CREDITS

Text Huub Sloot and Mariken Gaanderse

Partly based on training materials of

Annemarie Gehrels

Editing Roeline Knottnerus

Cartoons Auke Herrema (www.aukeherrema.nl)

Design cover ICCO

Design interior Margo Vlamings (www.margovlamings.nl)

Printing Drukkerij Roos en Roos

ICCO
Postbus 8190
3503 RD Utrecht
www.icco.nl

Guidelines on lobby
and advocacy

Page 56

Guidelines on lobby
and advocacy

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