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TitleMOC 20687C ENU Companion
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Table of Contents
                            20687C: Configuring Windows® 8.1
	Module 1: Windows 8.1 in an Enterprise Environment
		Lesson 2: Overview of Windows 8.1
			Demonstration: Customizing the Windows 8.1 UI
			Demonstration: Customizing Windows 8.1 Settings
		Module Review and Takeaways
	Module 2: Installing and Deploying Windows 8.1
		Lesson 1: Preparing to Install and Deploy Windows 8.1
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 2: Installing Windows 8.1
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 3: Customizing and Preparing a Windows 8.1 Image for Deployment
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Building an Answer File by Using Windows SIM
			Demonstration: Creating Bootable Windows PE Media
		Lesson 4: Volume Activation for Windows 8.1
			Question and Answers
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Installing Windows 8.1
			Lab B: Customizing and Capturing a Windows 8.1 Image
			Lab C: Deploying a Windows 8.1 Image
	Module 3: Managing Profiles and User State in Windows 8.1
		Lesson 1: Managing User Profiles
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring Roaming User Profiles and Folder Redirection
		Lesson 2: Configuring User State Virtualization
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 3: Migrating User State and Settings
			Question and Answers
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Configuring Profiles and User State Virtualization
			Lab B: Migrating User State by Using USMT
	Module 4: Tools Used for Configuring and Managing Windows 8.1
		Lesson 2: Using Windows PowerShell to Configure and Manage Windows 8.1
			Demonstration: Using Windows PowerShell ISE
			Demonstration: Using Windows PowerShell Remoting
		Lesson 3: Using Group Policy to Manage Windows 8.1
			Demonstration: Configuring Group Policy Settings
			Demonstration: Configuring Domain-Based GPOs
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab: Using Management Tools to Configure Windows 8.1 Settings
	Module 5: Managing Disks and Device Drivers
		Lesson 1: Managing Disks, Partitions, and Volumes
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Creating a Simple Volume
			Demonstration: Creating Spanned and Striped Volumes
			Demonstration: Resizing a Volume
		Lesson 2: Maintaining Disks, Partitions, and Volumes
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring Disk Maintenance Tasks
		Lesson 4: Installing and Configuring Device Drivers
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Managing Drivers
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Managing Disks
			Lab B: Configuring Device Drivers
	Module 6: Configuring Network Connectivity
		Lesson 1: Configuring IPv4 Network Connectivity
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring an IPv4 Address
		Lesson 3: Implementing Automatic IP Address Allocation
			Demonstration: Configuring a Windows 8.1 Computer to Obtain an IPv4 Configuration Automatically
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Configuring a Network Connection
			Lab B: Resolving Network Connectivity Issues
	Module 7: Configuring Resource Access for Domain-Joined and Non-Domain Joined Devices
		Lesson 1: Configuring Domain Access for Windows 8.1 Devices
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Adding a Computer to a Domain
		Lesson 2: Configuring Resource Access for Non-Domain Devices
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 3: Configuring Workplace Join
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Demonstration: Enrolling Devices
		Lesson 4: Configuring Work Folders
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring Work Folders
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab: Configuring Resource Access for Non-Domain Joined Devices
	Module 8: Implementing Network Security
		Lesson 2: Configuring Windows Firewall
			Demonstration: Configuring Inbound and Outbound Rules
		Lesson 3: Securing Network Traffic by Using IPsec
			Demonstration: Configuring an IPsec Rule
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Configuring Inbound and Outbound Firewall Rules
			Lab B: Configuring IPsec Rules
			Lab C: Configuring Malware Protection
	Module 9: Configuring File Access and Printers on Windows® 8.1 Clients
		Lesson 1: Managing File Access
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring Local Security Permissions for Files and Folders
		Lesson 2: Managing Shared Folders
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 3: Configuring File Compression
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Compressing Files and Folders
		Lesson 5: Managing Printers
			Demonstration: Installing and Sharing a Printer
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Configuring File Access
			Lab B: Configuring Printers
	Module 10: Securing Windows 8.1 Devices
		Lesson 1: Authentication and Authorization in Windows 8.1
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring a Picture Password or PIN for Authentication
		Lesson 2: Implementing Local Policies
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Creating Multiple Local GPOs
			Demonstration: Configuring Local Security Policy Settings
		Lesson 3: Securing Data with EFS and BitLocker
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Encrypting Files and Folders with EFS
		Lesson 4: Configuring UAC
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring UAC with GPOs
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Implementing Local GPOs
			Lab B: Securing Data by Using BitLocker
	Module 11: Configuring Applications for Windows 8.1
		Lesson 2: Managing Windows Store Apps
			Demonstration: Sideloading Windows Store Apps
		Lesson 3: Configuring Internet Explorer Settings
			Demonstration: Configuring Internet Explorer
		Lesson 4: Configuring Application Restrictions
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring AppLocker Rules
			Demonstration: Enforcing AppLocker Rules
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Configuring Internet Explorer Security
			Lab B: Configuring AppLocker
	Module 12: Optimizing and Maintaining Windows 8.1 Computers
		Lesson 1: Optimizing Performance in Windows 8.1
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Using Resource Monitor
			Demonstration: Analyzing System Performance by Using Performance Monitor and Data Collector Sets
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Optimizing Windows 8.1 Performance
	Module 13: Configuring Mobile Computing and Remote Access
		Lesson 1: Configuring Mobile Computers and Device Settings
			Demonstration: Configuring Power Plans
		Lesson 2: Overview of DirectAccess
			Demonstration: Configuring DirectAccess by Running the Getting Started Wizard
			Demonstration: Identifying the Getting Started Wizard Settings
		Lesson 3: Configuring VPN Access
			Demonstration: Configuring a VPN
			Demonstration: Creating a Connection Profile
		Lesson 4: Configuring Remote Desktop and Remote Assistance
			Demonstration: Configuring Remote Assistance
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab A: Configuring a Power Plan
			Lab B: Implementing DirectAccess by Using the Getting Started Wizard
			Lab C: Implementing Remote Desktop
	Module 14: Recovering Windows® 8.1
		Lesson 1: Backing Up and Restoring Files in Windows 8.1
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Configuring and Using File History
		Lesson 2: Recovery Options in Windows 8.1
			Question and Answers
			Demonstration: Resolving Startup-Related Problems
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab: Recovering Windows 8.1
	Module 15: Configuring Client Hyper-V
		Lesson 1: Overview of Client Hyper-V
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 2: Creating Virtual Machines
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 3: Managing Virtual Hard Disks
			Question and Answers
		Lesson 4: Managing Checkpoints
			Question and Answers
		Module Review and Takeaways
		Lab Review Questions and Answers
			Lab: Configuring Client Hyper-V
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

O F F I C I A L M I C R O S O F T L E A R N I N G P R O D U C T

20687C
Configuring Windows® 8.1
Companion Content

Page 2

ii Configuring Windows® 8.1

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Product Number: 20687C

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Page 92

8-6 Configuring Windows 8.1

Demonstration: Configuring an IPsec Rule

Demonstration Steps

Create a connection rule
1. Switch to LON-CL1.

2. Open the Settings charm, click Control Panel, click System and Security, and then click Windows
Firewall.

3. In the left pane, click Advanced settings, and then click Connection Security Rules.

4. In the Actions pane, click New Rule.

5. On the Rule Type page, verify that Isolation is selected, and then click Next.

6. On the Requirements page, select Require authentication for inbound connections and request
authentication for outbound connections, and then click Next.

7. On the Authentication Method page, select Computer and user (Kerberos V5), and then click
Next.

8. On the Profile page, click Next.

9. On the Name page, in the Name text box, type Authenticate all inbound connections, and then
click Finish.

10. Close the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security window.

Test connectivity between LON-CL2 and LON-CL1
1. In the host system, click the 20687C-LON-CL2 window.

2. At a command prompt, type ping LON-CL1, and then press Enter.

3. Verify that the ping generated four “Request timed out” messages.

4. Close the Command Prompt window.

Create a connection rule by using Windows PowerShell®
1. From the Start screen, type Power, right-click Windows PowerShell, and then click Run as

Administrator.

2. In the Administrator: Windows PowerShell window, type the following, and then Press Enter:

New-NetIPsecRule –DisplayName “Authenticate all inbound connections” –InboundSecurity
Require –OutboundSecurity Request -Phase1AuthSet ComputerKerberos -Phase2AuthSet
UserKerberos

Test connectivity between LON-CL2 and LON-CL1
1. In the Administrator: Windows PowerShell window, type ping LON-CL1, and then press Enter.

2. Verify that the ping generated four “Reply from 172.16.0.50: bytes=32 time=xms TTL=128” messages
(your times might vary).

3. Open the Settings charm, click Control Panel, click System and Security, and then click Windows
Firewall.

4. In the left pane, click Advanced settings.

5. In the left pane, expand Monitoring, and then expand Security Associations.

6. Click Main Mode, and then examine the information in the center pane.

Page 93

Implementing Network Security 8-7

7. Click Quick Mode, and then examine the information in the center pane.

8. Close all open windows.

Examine the security associations on LON-CL1 by using Windows PowerShell
1. In the host system, click the 20687C-LON-CL1 window.

2. From the Start screen, type Power, right-click Windows PowerShell, and then click Run as
Administrator.

3. To examine the Main Mode Security Associations, run the following cmdlet:

Get-NetIPsecMainModeSA

4. To examine the Quick Mode Security Associations, run the following cmdlet:

Get-NetIPsecQuickModeSA

Page 183

15-10 Configuring Windows® 8.1

Module Review and Takeaways
Review Question(s)
Question: Why would you deploy Client Hyper-V to a Windows client computer in a corporate
environment?

Answer: Users can use Client Hyper-V to work with Hyper-V-based virtual machines for troubleshooting
and testing purposes. You also can use it as an isolated test environment or for running multiple
operating systems on the same computer.

Question: Why should you not use virtual machine checkpoints for backup and disaster recovery?

Answer: Checkpoints enable you to apply older point-in-time snapshot to a virtual machine. But
checkpoints depend on virtual machine files, and if those files are not available, you cannot use
checkpoints even if checkpoint files are still available. Therefore, if the physical disk on which a
virtual machine stores files fails, you will not be able to recover the virtual machine only by using
checkpoint files.

Question: Can you create a checkpoint of a virtual machine that is turned off?

Answer: Yes. You can create a checkpoint of a virtual machine as long as it is not in a paused state. If you
create a checkpoint of a virtual machine that is in the off state, it will be smaller than the
checkpoint of a running virtual machine because the checkpoint will not contain virtual machine
memory.

Question: When you open Windows PowerShell and run the New-VM cmdlet to create a new virtual
machine, you get an error that New-VM is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet. What could be the
most probable reason for such an error?

Answer: New-VM is one of the cmdlets in the Hyper-V module for Windows PowerShell. The most
probable reason for the error is that the Hyper-V module is not available on the computer. If you
want to use the cmdlet, you should turn on the Hyper-V module for Windows PowerShell feature.

Tools
Tool Description Where to find it

Hyper-V Manager Management console for Client Hyper-V Start screen

Hyper-V Virtual
Machine
Connection tool


Connect directly to local or remote virtual
machines without opening Hyper-V Manager

Start screen

Page 184

Configuring Client Hyper-V 15-11

Lab Review Questions and Answers
Lab: Configuring Client Hyper-V

Question and Answers
Question: Why did you have to use a native boot from a Windows 8.1 virtual hard disk to complete this
lab?

Answer: An operating system that performs virtualization has to run directly on the computer’s hardware.
You cannot turn on the Hyper-V feature if Windows 8.1 is running on a virtual machine.
Therefore, you had to use native boot from a Windows 8.1 virtual hard disk for this lab.

Question: In the lab, you created a private virtual switch to connect to the virtual machine. Would a
private virtual switch be the logical choice if you were using the virtual machine for testing Windows
Updates? Why or why not?

Answer: A private virtual switch would limit the virtual machine to connectivity with other virtual
machines that are running on the same Windows 8.1 Client Hyper-V. This would not be a good
choice for Windows Updates because the computer will need Internet connectivity to download
the updates. The external virtual switch would be best suited for a virtual machine that you are
using to test Windows Updates.

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