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CA LI FOR N I A STA N DA R DS T E ST G R A D E

Released Test Questions English–Language Arts 6

Introduction - Grade 6 English–Language Arts

The following released test questions are taken from the Grade 6 English–Language Arts Standards Test. This
test is one of the California Standards Tests administered as part of the Standardized Testing and Reporting
(STAR) Program under policies set by the State Board of Education.

All questions on the California Standards Tests are evaluated by committees of content experts, including
teachers and administrators, to ensure their appropriateness for measuring the California academic content
standards in Grade 6 English–Language Arts. In addition to content, all items are reviewed and approved to
ensure their adherence to the principles of fairness and to ensure no bias exists with respect to characteristics
such as gender, ethnicity, and language.

This document contains released test questions from the California Standards Test forms in 2003, 2004, 2005,
2006, and 2007. First on the pages that follow are lists of the standards assessed on the Grade 6 English–
Language Arts Test. Next are released passages and test questions. Following the questions is a table that gives
the correct answer for each question, the content standard that each question is measuring, and the year each
question last appeared on the test.

The following table lists each strand/reporting cluster, the number of items that appear on the exam, and the
number of released test questions that appear in this document.

NUMBER OF NUMBER OF
STRAND/REPORTING CLUSTER QUESTIONS RELEASED

ON EXAM TEST QUESTIONS

• Word Analysis 13 15

• Reading Comprehension 17 25

• Literary Response and Analysis 12 12

• Writing Strategies 17 24

• Written Conventions 16 19

TOTAL 75 95

In selecting test questions for release, three criteria are used: (1) the questions adequately cover a selection of
the academic content standards assessed on the Grade 6 English–Language Arts Test; (2) the questions
demonstrate a range of difficulty; and (3) the questions present a variety of ways standards can be assessed.
These released test questions do not reflect all of the ways the standards may be assessed. Released test
questions will not appear on future tests.

For more information about the California Standards Tests, visit the California Department of Education’s
Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/resources.asp.

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected

based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/resources.asp

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Released Test Questions English–Language Arts 6
READING

The Reading portion of the Grade 6 California English–Language Arts Standards Test has three strands/
reporting clusters: Word Analysis, Reading Comprehension, and Literary Response and Analysis. Each of
these strands/clusters is described below.

The Word Analysis Strand/Cluster

The following four California English–Language Arts content standards are included in the Word Analysis
strand/cluster and are represented in this booklet by 15 test questions for grade 6. These questions represent
only some ways in which these standards may be assessed on the Grade 6 California English–Language Arts
Standards Test.

6RW1.0 WORD ANALYSIS, FLUENCY, AND SYSTEMATIC VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT:
Students use their knowledge of word origins and word relationships, as well as
historical and literary context clues, to determine the meaning of specialized
vocabulary and to understand the precise meaning of grade-level-appropriate words.

6RW1.2 Vocabulary and Concept Development: Identify and interpret figurative language and
words with multiple meanings.

6RW1.3 Vocabulary and Concept Development: Recognize the origins and meanings of
frequently used foreign words in English and use these words accurately in speaking and
writing.

6RW1.4 Vocabulary and Concept Development: Monitor expository text for unknown words or
words with novel meanings by using word, sentence, and paragraph clues to determine
meaning.

6RW1.5 Vocabulary and Concept Development: Understand and explain “shades of meaning” in
related words (e.g., softly and quietly).

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected

based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

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Released Test Questions English–Language Arts 6
Should Good Sportsmanship Be Taught in School?

1 Almost everyone feels that it is important for young people to win fairly and show respect toward others.
Should good sportsmanship, then, be taught in school? Critics do not think so. Some feel that actions like
showing off are minor and do not need to be addressed through the school curriculum. The need for debate is
obvious. The stronger argument, however, favors teaching good sportsmanship. Presented here are the most
important benefits of teaching sportsmanship.

Teaching Good Sportsmanship

2 Teaching good sportsmanship and having a positive attitude in activities like sports, class elections,
and science fair competitions are critical to success in school. Activities involving winning or losing can
be tense. Acting calmly under pressure helps young adults succeed not only in sports but also in life. Good
sportsmanship is not a given; it must be promoted in school. Young people must be directed to role models
who practice sportsmanship.

Knowing Rules

3 Good team players know the rules of the game. A person cannot play by the rules if he or she does not
understand what the rules are. Many arguments on the playing field could be avoided if athletes understood their
responsibilities. Knowing the rules also applies to other activities. If students enter a science fair competition, for
example, they must follow the guidelines. Additionally, knowledge provides a competitive advantage. Those who
know the rules are much more likely to succeed. In school, for example, success is definitely emphasized. When
students learn sportsmanship, they discover how knowing the rules relates to achievement.

Managing Frustration

4 Using good sportsmanship helps people stay focused and in control. Almost everyone has overheard a
heated argument between a player and a referee. Good players do not argue with other players, coaches, or
officials. They deal with frustrations calmly; consequently, they stay in control of their game. Good players
focus on achieving. Uncontrolled anger can actually cause a person to make errors. This result is especially
embarrassing. Additionally, people can be labeled if they act out their frustrations. A good sport is known for
his or her positive conduct, and not for being a “hothead” or a “bully.” Teaching students the consequences
of their actions is part of sportsmanship. Students therefore learn to manage frustrations in sports and other
activities to maximize performance.

Taking Responsibility

5 Good players become skilled at handling responsibility. When people accept responsibility, they achieve
their best. Positive thinkers, moreover, influence others, especially those who are struggling with a problem.
A gifted basketball player, for example, might teach skills to a less-talented player. Helping others raises the
performance of the entire team. The team, consequently, could reach new heights and set new records. Good
sportsmanship, however, means “owning up” to mistakes as well. Those who do not practice sportsmanship
pass off responsibility. For them, if an opportunity is lost, it is someone else’s fault. Imagine a team of players
all acting in their own self-interest—the opposite of what a team really should be. Students who participate on
a team, be it a math small-group project or the school band, benefit by learning to accept responsibility and
learning to encourage others.

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected

based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

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CA LI FOR N I A STA N DA R DS T E ST G R A D E

Released Test Questions English–Language Arts 6
Enjoying Victory, Accepting Defeat

6 Sportsmanship allows people to enjoy victory to the fullest. If people win, but their accomplishments are
based on cheating or other unethical behavior, are they really winners? Good players follow the rules. They
feel proud even in defeat because their game is based on integrity, honesty, and respect. Winners congratulate
their opponents as part of recognizing the efforts of others. This friendly behavior spreads goodwill from their
team to other teams. Players who show respect to fans, coaches, and other players receive respect in return.
They are recognized as leaders. In learning sportsmanship, students explore role models of positive behavior.
They learn what it takes to be a leader; they also learn to win and lose with grace.

Final Points

7 Sportsmanship is a winning idea. It must be taught in school. Students need direction to become “good
sports.” Students will be responsible for their own actions and will have a positive influence on others. As
students enter the workforce, businesses benefit. The community also benefits, because these students will
someday become leaders. We need to start educating students about how sportsmanship pays off for everyone.

CSR2P038

39 Read this sentence from paragraph 1 of the
essay.

Some feel that actions like showing off are
minor and do not need to be addressed
through the school curriculum.

What is the meaning of the word minor as it is
used in the sentence?

A

B

C

D

harmful

average

childish

unimportant

CSR20612.038

40 Which detail is intended to persuade the reader
that lack of control hinders performance?

A Good team players know the rules of the
game.

B Uncontrolled anger can actually cause a
person to make errors.

C Additionally, people can be labeled if they act
out their frustrations.

D Teaching students the consequences of their
actions is part of sportsmanship.

CSR20616.038

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This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected

based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

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CA LI FOR N I A STA N DA R DS T E ST G R A D E

Released Test Questions English–Language Arts 6
Question Number Correct Answer Standard Year of Release

36 C 6RC2.5 2007

37 C 6RC2.5 2007

38 C 6RC2.8 2007

39 D 6RW1.2 2007

40 B 6RC2.8 2007

41 C 6RC2.8 2007

42 C 6RC2.3 2007

43 B 6RW1.2 2007

44 B 6RW1.3 2003

45 B 6RW1.3 2003

46 C 6RW1.5 2003

47 C 6RW1.3 2004

48 A 6RW1.2 2004

49 A 6RW1.2 2005

50 A 6RW1.2 2006

51 C 6RW1.5 2006

52 C 6RW1.5 2007

53 C 6WS1.1 2003

54 B 6WS1.4 2003

55 C 6WS1.2.2 2003

56 B 6WS1.1 2003

57 D 6WC1.5 2003

58 D 6WC1.3 2003

59 B 6WC1.5 2003

60 A 6WC1.4 2003

61 A 6WS1.2.2 2004

62 C 6WC1.5 2004

63 B 6WC1.4 2004

64 C 6WC1.3 2004

65 C 6WS1.4 2004

66 B 6WS1.2.2 2004

67 A 6WC1.1 2004

68 B 6WS1.6 2004

69 D 6WS1.2.3 2004

70 B 6WS1.1 2005

— 51 —
This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected

based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

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G R A D E CA LI FOR N I A STA N DA R DS T E ST

Released Test Questions English–Language Arts 6
Question Number Correct Answer Standard Year of Release

71 C 6WS1.1 2005

72 B 6WS1.2.2 2005

73 B 6WC1.2 2005

74 C 6WC1.4 2005

75 C 6WS1.2.3 2005

76 B 6WS1.6 2005

77 B 6WS1.6 2006

78 B 6WC1.4 2006

79 D 6WC1.1 2006

80 A 6WS1.2.2 2006

81 B 6WS1.6 2006

82 D 6WS1.6 2006

83 B 6WC1.5 2006

84 B 6WS1.6 2006

85 D 6WS1.3 2006

86 A 6WC1.5 2007

87 C 6WC1.3 2007

88 C 6WC1.1 2007

89 A 6WC1.2 2007

90 D 6WS1.2.C 2007

91 C 6WS1.4 2007

92 A 6WC1.5 2007

93 D 6WS1.6 2007

94 A 6WC1.4 2007

95 C 6WS1.1 2007

— 52 —
This is a sample of California Standards Test questions. This is NOT an operational test form. Test scores cannot be projected

based on performance on released test questions. Copyright © 2008 California Department of Education.

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